Art in the Attic

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ALMONTE- Art in the Attic occurred on the first weekend of May this year (6-8). This event is an art show that takes place annually in the upstairs of the old Town Hall. This year marks the second year that Almonte High School (ADHS) art students have had the opportunity to showcase and sell their work.  The show this year featured a few large murals, dozens of prints and paintings, as well as a whole corner devoted to drawings of the skeleton.

 

Accompanying these anatomic graphite sketches was the skeleton itself– possibly Almonte’s oldest high school teacher. For the past few decades it has dangled timelessly in front of ADHS art and science students, showing the organic structure of the human body.

This year’s show featured a variety of art from different media, although there were fewer ‘large‘ pieces of art than in last year's show. Bill Treusch, leader of the art program at Almonte High School, explained that the school timetable this year influenced the output of the show.

“There were more photos and drawings this year because the big work from (art) class had not been completed yet,” he said.

Last year’s show took place later in the semester, so there were more murals and sculptures completed at that time. Large pieces of art are harder to let go of..the kind of work that a young budding artist might have trouble parting with. However, this year was different: since there were fewer ‘large’ pieces, many students had prints and smaller pictures that sold at a low price. The result was greater financial success,with many more sales.

Emilie Scott, Youth Liason for Art In The Attic, said she was very impressed with how this year’s show turned out.

“It was really great,” she said, mentioning that there was a lot more youth interest this time around.

“People were going into it (the show) with the intention of selling their work,” she said, “so they put effort into it to make it happen.”

But money is not everything, especially when art is concerned. Several students found it strange to put prices on their work.

“It can be really hard,” said Edan Wolk, a grade 12 art student at ADHS, “Because art is so subjective.”

Not only do students have the opportunity to make some money in their artistic pursuits, it gives them a look at what the community thinks of their work.

“It gets their art out of the class and into the view of the public,” said Treusch, “It opens them up to a public response.”

This year, a guestbook was left by the front desk.

  "This work is an inspiration — your students give us high hopes for the future,” wrote Glenda Jones.