Mailboxes of Mississipi Mills – Part 2

Neil

by Neil Carleton

Some birds in Mississippi Mills don’t migrate as colder weather approaches.  Northern cardinals and black-capped chickadees, for example, can be seen throughout the year.  Their images can also be found on mailboxes along our rural roads.

23 Pakenham 4th 2941 June 21 2013
This northern cardinal is perched in a sumac. A few red leaves indicate that the artist chose an early fall scene to capture the splendor of its plumage. This species, Cardinalis cardinalis, was named by early American colonists

24 Pakenham 9th N 3011 June 18 2013
A Canada goose sentinel watches over this pair of northern cardinals.
25 Ramsay 8th 274 June 13 2013
Nothing can evoke the mystique and imagery of the Canadian wilderness like the haunting call of the common loon at dusk.
26 Ramsay 8th 2477 June 11 2013
Black-capped chickadees are cheery visitors at any time of the year.

The hole sizes of these nesting boxes might be suitable for a wren (left) and an eastern bluebird.  Plans for making nesting boxes are available at a variety of websites, including nestwatch.org.  Bluebird nesting boxes can be purchased locally from the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists (Cliff Bennett 613-256-5013).
The hole sizes of these nesting boxes might be suitable for a wren (left) and an eastern bluebird. Plans for making nesting boxes are available at a variety of websites, including nestwatch.org. Bluebird nesting boxes can be purchased locally from the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists (Cliff Bennett 613-256-5013).
31 Appleton Side Road 4900 June 18 2013
The bright colours of lady beetles are warnings to bug eaters, like birds, because all lady beetles have toxic chemicals in their systems that make them taste bad. Aphids are their favourite food. A big adult lady beetle can eat upwards to 60 aphids a day.