Water still rising, warns MVCA

by Brent Eades

The Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority issued a new flood warning today, advising that levels along the river system are likely to keep rising through the long weekend.

The rain may have stopped for now — but be vigilant, especially if you live or travel near the Mississippi River or its tributaries:


April 20, 2019 — The Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority is issuing an update to the FLOOD WARNING for the Mississippi AND CARP RIVER watersheds issued April 17, 2019.  Rainfall amounts over the last four days have exceeded 100 mm in many areas and another 25 to 30 mm is forecasted for today.

Severe flood levels are expected to be reached at numerous locations:

Dalhousie Lake – levels increasing 25 – 40 cm above today’s current elevation of 157.58 m. This will bring levels to or possibly higher than those experienced in 1998 and 2017. Depending on the timing of the rainfall, those levels are anticipated to be reached by Sunday or Monday and will remain at or near those levels over the next 5 to 7 days.

Mississippi Lake – levels increasing 20 – 35 cm above today’s current elevation of 135.36 m. Levels are expected to be close to those experienced in 1998. Peak levels are expected to be reached Tuesday or Wednesday of next week and will remain at or near those levels over the next 5 to 7 days.

Mississippi River downstream of Mississippi Lake – flows are expected to continue to increase throughout the weekend. Elevations will vary due to the topography of the shoreline of the river. All residents along the river should keep a close watch on levels and take necessary precautions to protect their property.

Clyde Fall and Indian Rivers – flows are increasing but rate of rise appears to be slowing down for the time being. This will change. Flows are not expected to reach those observed in 1998 but could get close by Monday if additional rain occurs throughout the day today.

Carp River – flows have increased again over the last 24 hours to reach those experienced earlier in the week. Should rainfall occur today, flows will respond to that rainfall very quickly but are not expected to reach those experienced in 1998.

Areas not specifically identified – all other areas of the watershed along a watercourse should expect levels and flows to increase throughout the day as a result of the rain already observed and what is in the forecast.

Flood waters overflowed the highway into Pakenham earlier in the week