Almonte General Hospital was included in a nation wide survey and ranking of Canadian hospitals based on information and data provided by the hospital, and analyzed and published by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). The data represents hospital performance in the fiscal years 2010-11 or 2011-12.

The Almonte General rated an A+ for readmissions after medical treatment (fewer readmissions than average for similarly sized Canadian hospitals), but a D for adverse events tied to nursing care and for readmissions after surgery (more adverse events and readmissions than average for similarly sized Canadian hospitals). Approximately 40 respondents  who have so far completed a short on-line survey have given the hospital an excellent rating for respect, communication, timely care and cleanliness. See the hospital’s rating here. The Ottawa Hospitals, both Civic and General Campuses, also obtained a C rating.

The Almonte General refused to participate in a CBC survey sent to hospitals, developed with the help of health care experts, that asked questions about initiatives to improve care and safety.  The CBC’s Fifth Estate will devote a program to its survey on CBC’s main channel at 9 p.m. on Friday April 12. CBC”s scoring system was criticized by the  the Ontario Hospital Association’s CEO and president, Pat Campbell, who stated that  the group had some “significant concerns with the methodology.”

More about the ratings

The CBC’s premier investigative program Fifth Estate conducted the first ever national hospital rank rating in Canada. Unlike the United States and the U.K., Canada remains one of the few developed countries that has kept basic information on how well hospitals care for you largely hidden from public view. With expert input, advanced statistical analysis and in-depth surveys of patients, nurses and hospital CEOs, the fifth estate gives Canadians never-before-available information on the best and worst aspects of hospitals in the country.

Patients trying to find information about hospitals often have few resources beyond their family doctor’s recommendation. CBC’s Rate My Hospital is a call for more accountability and transparency in our health care system..

The methodology that underpins CBC’s Rate My Hospital was developed with the help of a panel of Canadian, British and American experts who are leaders in assessing hospital quality and performance.

The panel met in Toronto in November 2012 to develop an outline for the report card. Jason Sutherland and Peter Austin, Canadian biostatisticians noted for their work in evaluating health system performance, developed the statistical methodology used to rate hospitals.

Hospital ratings are based on data collected and reported by more than 600 acute care hospitals in Canada and analyzed and published by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). The data represents hospital performance in the fiscal years 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Using the data for five important measures of patient outcomes, CBC ranked the performance of 239 Canadian hospitals. It also provides grades for individual performance measures on a total of more than 600 hospitals.

When grading hospitals, CBC chose five key performance measures from a list of 21 indicators published by CIHI in March.

Many of the indicators reported by CIHI focus on specialties such as obstetrics and cardiac care, but not all hospitals offer the full range of specialized care.

CBC  limited its assessment to five measures that assess the quality of general surgical and medical treatment only. Including the specialty services would have significantly reduced the number of hospitals we could rate.

Performance measures were also eliminated  if reliable data was unavailable for most of the hospitals we examined. For small hospitals, the grades are based on three of the five measures.

CIHI’s data divides hospitals into four groups:

  • Small community hospitals.
  • Medium community hospitals.
  • Large community hospitals.
  • Teaching hospitals.

Hospitals of the same size and that treat similar types of patients are grouped together. Placing hospitals in four groups levels the playing field and makes it easier to compare them.

CIHI has also adjusted the data to account for factors that may contribute to worse outcomes, such as age, gender and whether a patient has multiple medical problems. These risk adjustments are intended to make comparisons between hospitals of the same size more valid.

CBC’s ratings are based on a statistical model known as standardization. Each hospital’s performance was standardized on every quality indicator.

CBC  then used a quantity called the standard deviation to measure how the hospital’s performance compares to other hospitals of the same size.

The overall rating for each hospital is the average of its standardized scores for each of the five or three indicators used in our report.

Five grades were assigned based on how much the standardized scores or their average deviated from those of a typical hospital of the same size:

A+ Hospitals whose reported rates show that their performance is substantially better than a typical hospital of the same size. These hospitals have a standardized score of -1 or lower (i.e. 1.0 or more standard deviations below the mean.)
A Hospitals whose reported rates show that their performance is better than a typical hospital of the same size. These hospitals have a standardized score from -0.5 to -0.999 (i.e. between 0.5 and 0.999 standard deviations below the mean.)
B Hospitals whose reported rates show that their performance is similar to a typical hospital of the same size. These hospitals have a standardized score between -0.5 and 0.5 (i.e. within 0.5 standard deviations from the mean).
C Hospitals whose reported rates show that their performance is below that of a typical hospital of the same size. These hospitals have a standardized score from 0.5 to 0.999 (i.e. between 0.5 and 0.999 standard deviations above the mean).
D Hospitals whose reported rates show that their performance is substantially below that of a typical hospital of the same size. These hospitals have a standardized score of 1.0 or more (i.e. 1 or more standard deviations above the mean).