David

As a person who falls at the extreme introvert end of the introvert/extrovert continuum, I have found the book The Introvert Advantage by Marti Olsen Laney (Workman Publishing, 2002) to be extremely helpful. She observes that while introverts are often viewed as being antisocial, the reality is very different. We are just social in a different way – we need fewer relationships but want more connection and intimacy. We don’t enjoy idle chitchat, preferring meaty conversations. She is careful to point out that neither is superior – extroverts and introverts just relate to social situations in a different way.

For those of us that are on the introvert end of the scale social interaction can be easier if it goes along with great food and great music. Which brings me to a plug for Five Wednesdays in July (I agree that it’s a great logo but it can perhaps be a bit confusing in a year that only has four Wednesdays).

Five Wednesdays in July takes place in Augusta Park in Almonte from 6 to 8pm with music and food and lots of opportunities for social interaction! Come and tour the community garden. Our volunteers have been busy pulling weeds, hoeing and spreading straw and chips.

This year features a stellar line-up of kind-hearted musicians who are all playing for free in this wonderful community park. This week features The Rapids with Greg Kelly.

This week is also a community potluck dinner because you bring such great food! What is your favourite summer supper recipe? Are you bringing it? Don’t forget to bring pie! I plan to bring my famous meatballs in the hopes of instigating some meaty conversations.

Music in Augusta Park is for me a powerful demonstration of connections between food, gardening and community. Why does the sharing of food create a sense of community? This is something that I think is taken for granted as a constant in our society. Virtually every special occasion is built around food and drink.

What’s the connection between gardening and community? I am not proposing that we should all go out and grow our own food in a community garden. What I am saying is that the need for community is a pretty basic human need. There are many ways to connect with other humans and to build community. Growing food together in my experience creates community. Of course it is not the only way but it is a very powerful one. 

The shed finally moves!

After many, many delays the plan to move our beautiful new garden shed to its prepared pad at Carleton Place Community Garden finally came to fruition. The weather gods briefly relented and after a couple of days with minimal rain the move took place last week. Many thanks are due to the Hackberry Men’s Shed Group of Carleton Place and to Apple Hill Towing of Carleton Place who all volunteered their labour to make this happen. The following photo shows the shed in transit. A halt was required for technical adjustments in the centre of Carleton Place – traffic was backed up for almost two blocks!