Pen imageReluctantly, the Millstone is moving to preapproval of comments. We recognize that this impedes the free flow of conversation to some degree but we have been disappointed in the attitude expressed by  some commenters who are using the comment privilege to carry out private attacks and post sarcastic remarks that are not of interest or value to most readers of the Millstone. There are many residents who are making valuable contributions through the comment sections and we want to allow those voices to be heard. We have tried other measures — encouraging commenters to post with their real names, posting comment guidelines — but they appear to have had little effect. We will now try the preapproval option. Readers may let us know their views about this by e-mailing us at millstoneeditor@bell.net.

24 COMMENTS

  1. While this would by no means be a complete solution to the problem, I think that requiring commenters to use their real names would be a good step.

  2. Unfortunately, while we can encourage that, we cannot control it. We can insist that people provide a valid e-mail address, but that address does not always reveal the real name and a person can essentially use any name he or she wishes.
    Last evening I removed “guest” posts on the rationale that they were not “real names” but I realize that if we do that, we are forcing people to use facebook and many Almonte residents, we think, don’t have facebook accounts. We don’t want to exclude those people so we will focus on the content of the comments.

  3. Unfortunately, while we can encourage that, we cannot control it. We can insist that people provide a valid e-mail address, but that address does not always reveal the real name and a person can essentially use any name he or she wishes.
    Last evening I removed “guest” posts on the rationale that they were not “real names” but I realize that if we do that, we are forcing people to use facebook and many Almonte residents, we think, don’t have facebook accounts. We don’t want to exclude those people so we will focus on the content of the comments.

  4. I, as editor, am usually posting about 1-2 hours per day. I can’t guarantee when posts will be approved but, for now, I think it will certainly be within the day.
    Edith

  5. I, as editor, am usually posting about 1-2 hours per day. I can’t guarantee when posts will be approved but, for now, I think it will certainly be within the day.
    Edith

  6. Ah, I see.
    While I support your decision, this will only play into the hands of the “Stolen Election” Truthers…who will now insist on seeing Shaun’s birth certificate!!

  7. Ah, I see.
    While I support your decision, this will only play into the hands of the “Stolen Election” Truthers…who will now insist on seeing Shaun’s birth certificate!!

  8. Perhaps some civility will prevail in supporting constructive dialog. While this measure seems necessary, It’s possible (if technology permits) a probationary threshold could be utilized—staving off concerns of censorship—and reduce overhead on the part of the Millstone.

  9. We can always reverse this if the tone of some comments improves. We were really reluctant to take this step. It limits spontaneity and makes the discussion slower and significantly increases the editors’ workload, but we felt we had to do something.

  10. We can always reverse this if the tone of some comments improves. We were really reluctant to take this step. It limits spontaneity and makes the discussion slower and significantly increases the editors’ workload, but we felt we had to do something.

  11. Quite understandable. In the culture of the internet (a level playing field), personal etiquette is subjective at best. Cultivating accuracy of meaning loses out to those who would wear their hearts on their sleeve.

  12. This is the kind of rhetoric that goes unnoticed/disregarded but if someone comments unkindly to Shaun then it’s jumped on instantaneously . That’s what I’m talking about. Censored and unfair comment if you ask me.

  13. This is the kind of rhetoric that goes unnoticed/disregarded but if someone comments unkindly to Shaun then it’s jumped on instantaneously . That’s what I’m talking about. Censored and unfair comment if you ask me.

  14. Sad to see that it has come to this. As a matter of principal, I will no longer be posting on this site while these conditions are in force. My father lost a eye in World War 2 fighting for our freedom. Approval of comments is something that happens in North Korea, not in Canada and especially not in Almonte.

  15. Sad to see that it has come to this. As a matter of principal, I will no longer be posting on this site while these conditions are in force. My father lost a eye in World War 2 fighting for our freedom. Approval of comments is something that happens in North Korea, not in Canada and especially not in Almonte.

  16. This is such a sledgehammer approach. Of all the comments that you have received, what percentage have been inappropriate? If it is statistically insignificant then why bother censoring otherwise valid comments?

    As with many things, there are two sides to the issue. What about protecting the privacy rights of those who would like to contribute respectful comments but remain anonymous?

    I find your attempt to coerce people to reveal their identity to run counter to what is going on in our society. Once you post something on the internet, it is there forever. In ten years time your views may have changed but whatever you write will still be there – readers may draw the wrong conclusions from something you wrote in the past.

    Why should I allow my employer with one quick search of my name get insight into my views? Why should I not have the right to participate in my community and maintain my privacy – I want to control my internet persona.

    More importantly, why would I want my government to know anything about what I think and write about? In this crazy world of changing values, stating something on the web that is ok today can be morphed into something negative tomorrow.

    I find your “policy” to be irresponsible. It shows a lack of understanding on privacy issues.

  17. This is such a sledgehammer approach. Of all the comments that you have received, what percentage have been inappropriate? If it is statistically insignificant then why bother censoring otherwise valid comments?

    As with many things, there are two sides to the issue. What about protecting the privacy rights of those who would like to contribute respectful comments but remain anonymous?

    I find your attempt to coerce people to reveal their identity to run counter to what is going on in our society. Once you post something on the internet, it is there forever. In ten years time your views may have changed but whatever you write will still be there – readers may draw the wrong conclusions from something you wrote in the past.

    Why should I allow my employer with one quick search of my name get insight into my views? Why should I not have the right to participate in my community and maintain my privacy – I want to control my internet persona.

    More importantly, why would I want my government to know anything about what I think and write about? In this crazy world of changing values, stating something on the web that is ok today can be morphed into something negative tomorrow.

    I find your “policy” to be irresponsible. It shows a lack of understanding on privacy issues.

Comments are closed.